Boston-area startup bringing you gas promises convenience and less environmental impact

Getting gasoline these days is an expensive endeavor, but a new company, now operating west of Boston, promises to bring gasoline to your doorstep while helping the environment. And they say the cost is comparable. Carmyn hopes to change the way we refuel, moving drivers away from the traditional gas station. It’s an appealing idea for Kate Hazen, whose car now fills up with a Carmyn truck without leaving her driveway in Sudbury. “One more stop is time out of my day,” she said. “It’s really convenient not to have one more thing, and it’s actually less than going to some of the gas stations around here.” “When you go to the gas station, how do you know if you’re getting a good price or a bad price?” asked Carmyn founder Ben Slayden. “The reason I’m really close to, actually cheaper, than some full-service stations is that I don’t have to buy expensive land to build a service station.” Slayden says the pricing model for Carmyn’s gas delivery service is simple and transparent. He says that on any given day, Carmyn charges the average price for a gallon of gas in the county where it is posted on AAA.com, plus a 10 percent service charge. Slayden buys the gas in bulk and says a tank to the driver’s house only costs about $2 to $3 more than a traditional gas station. But there’s more to Slayden driving than making life more convenient. He promised that Carmyn will take half of the money she makes and build solar power projects in the communities she serves, offsetting all those emissions from fuel-burning vehicles. “What is society doing to decarbonize those 274 million (gasoline-powered) vehicles?” Slayden said. “The answer is nothing. We’re not doing anything.” He said a trip to Patagonia at the southern tip of South America showed him the urgency of the climate crisis. But with hundreds of millions of gas-powered cars still on America’s roads and only a small fraction of electric or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles purchased each year, Slayden says the nation isn’t moving fast enough. “We have to do something today.” he said. Troy Ginther runs Natural Stone Wall Solutions and a sister landscaping company and says he has tried to reduce the environmental impact of his businesses by installing solar panels and purchasing electrical landscaping equipment. Using Carmyn to refuel vehicles After hours on site was a no-brainer. “I know it was completed here instead of a six-man crew in big trucks looking for a gas station, being time inefficient and also increasing our carbon footprint,” Ginther said. Brian Whittemore, co-owner of Pure Solutions, an organic mosquito, tick and lawn care company, came to the same conclusion. “We’ve been able to save on that downtime and also on fuel consumption to and from the gas station.” So while there’s an immediate environmental impact that shouldn’t be discounted, Slayden says his ultimate goal is to offset all emissions. for Carmyn fuel cars. He expects Carmyn to have its first solar installation in Sudbury within two years. Eventually, the goal is for Carmyn’s renewable energy company to become bigger than the fuel delivery business. “The more we can serve, the more solar we can build,” he said.

Getting gasoline these days is an expensive endeavor, but a new company, now operating west of Boston, promises to bring gasoline to your doorstep while helping the environment. And they say the cost is comparable.

Carmen is hoping to change the way we refuel, moving drivers away from the traditional service station. It’s an appealing idea for Kate Hazen, whose car now fills up with Carmyn’s truck without leaving her driveway in Sudbury.

“One more stop is time out of my day,” he said. “It’s really convenient not to have one more thing, and it’s actually less than going to some of the gas stations around here.”

“When you go to the gas station, how do you know if you’re getting a good price or a bad price?” asked Carmyn founder Ben Slayden. “The reason I’m really close to, actually cheaper, than some full-service stations is that I don’t have to buy expensive land to build a service station.”

Slayden says the pricing model for Carmyn’s gas delivery service is simple and transparent. He says that on any given day, Carmyn charges the average price for a gallon of gas in the county in which it is posted. AAA.com, plus a 10 percent service charge. Slayden buys gas in bulk and says that a gas station that delivers to the driver’s house only costs $2 to $3 more than a traditional gas station.

But there’s more to Slayden than making life more comfortable. He promised that Carmyn will take half of the money he earns and build solar power projects in the communities he serves, offsetting all those emissions from fuel-burning vehicles.

“What is society doing to decarbonize those 274 million (gasoline-powered) vehicles?” Slayden said. “The answer is nothing. We’re not doing anything.”

He said a trip to Patagonia at the southern tip of South America showed him the urgency of the climate crisis. But with hundreds of millions of gas-powered cars still on America’s roads and only a small fraction of electric or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles purchased each year, Slayden says the nation isn’t moving fast enough.

“We have to do something today,” he said.

Troy Ginther runs Natural Stone Wall Solutions and a sister landscaping company and says he has tried to reduce the environmental impact of his businesses by installing solar panels and purchasing electrical landscaping equipment. Using Carmyn to refuel vehicles after hours on site was a no brainer.

“I know it was completed here instead of a six-man crew in big trucks looking for a gas station, being time inefficient and also increasing our carbon footprint,” Ginther said.

Brian Whittemore, co-owner of Pure Solutions, an organic mosquito, tick, and lawn care company, came to the same conclusion.

“Previously, fueling for us was, you know, paying one of our technicians time off from his service day to come to the gas station,” he said. “We’ve been able to save on that downtime and also save on fuel consumption to and from the gas station.”

So while there’s an immediate environmental impact that shouldn’t be discounted, Slayden says his ultimate goal is to offset all the emissions from the cars Carmyn powers. He expects Carmyn to have its first solar installation in Sudbury within two years. Eventually, the goal is to make Carmyn’s renewable energy company bigger than the fuel delivery business.

“The more we can serve, the more solar we can build,” he said.

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