The fate of the possible Marina desalination plant will be decided on Thursday

The California Coastal Commission will decide whether to allow a proposed marine desalination plant on Thursday. But the mayor of Marina, Bruce Carlos Delgado, plans to fight it. “Marina doesn’t take any of the water, but all the damage,” Delgado said. “Our air, our coast, our groundwater are threatened, our vertical pools will dry up. The walking path to the beach will go through industrial facilities that Monterey and Carmel will never allow on their beaches.” The project was proposed by California American Water, which would use the plant to deliver millions of gallons of water to some 100,000 of its customers on the Monterey Peninsula, which are predominantly wealthier communities: the city of Monterey, Pacific Grove, Carmel- by- el-Mar and nearby Pebble Beach. The project is expected to supply 40 percent of the peninsula’s water needs. “You can imagine the popularity of putting an industrial site on the beaches of Monterey or on the beaches of Carmel. So we have a long pattern of injustice in this country, where unwanted industrial facilities are located in small, low-income communities. and dominated by minorities,” Delgado said. As climate change and drought persist across the state, water scarcity is becoming a pressing issue. Since 1995, there has been a state that imposed a cease and desist order, preventing the peninsula from drawing water from its main water supply, the Carmel River, which is drying up. A second cease and desist order was put in place in 2009 with an extended deadline of December 31, 2021 to comply. “It’s become politicized and I don’t understand why,” said Josh Stratton, a Cal Am spokesman. “The bottom line is we need more water. I think we all know that we are in a state of prolonged drought in the state of California and the Monterey, so I don’t understand why people would object to such a great project.” proponents have proposed expanding the input of recycled wastewater from the Peninsula delivered by Monterey One Water and the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District to Cal Am. It is touted as cheaper than the desalination plant, but critics question whether the water source would provide sufficient supply. To move forward, the California Public Utilities Commission would need to authorize the water expansion purchase and the deal would require Cal Am, M1W and MPWM to sign off. Cal Am says it still plans to sign that deal and suggests that both projects — the desalination plant and the water expansion — could move forward together. But according to MPWM, taking on both projects would bring unnecessary costs. The CPUC is scheduled to review the proposal on December 1.

The California Coastal Commission will decide whether to allow a proposed marine desalination plant on Thursday. But the mayor of Marina, Bruce Carlos Delgado, plans to fight it.

“Marina doesn’t take any of the water, but all the damage,” Delgado said. “Our air, our coast, our groundwater are threatened, our vertical pools will dry up. The walking path to the beach will go through industrial facilities that Monterey and Carmel will never allow on their beaches.”

The project was proposed by California American Water, which would use the plant to deliver millions of gallons of water to some 100,000 of its customers on the Monterey Peninsula, which are predominantly wealthier communities: the city of Monterey, Pacific Grove, Carmel- by- el-Mar and nearby Pebble Beach.

The project is expected to supply 40 percent of the peninsula’s water needs.

“You can imagine the popularity of putting an industrial site on the beaches of Monterey or on the beaches of Carmel. So we have a long pattern of injustice in this country, where unwanted industrial facilities are located in small, low-income communities. and dominated by minorities,” Delgado said.

As climate change and drought persist across the state, water scarcity is becoming a pressing issue.

Since 1995, there has been a state that imposed a cease and desist order, preventing the peninsula from drawing water from its main water supply, the Carmel River, which is drying up.

A second cease and desist order was put in place in 2009 with an extended deadline of December 31, 2021 to comply.

“It’s become politicized and I don’t understand why,” said Josh Stratton, a Cal Am spokesman. “The bottom line is we need more water. I think we all know that we are in a state of prolonged drought in the state of California and the Monterey, so I don’t understand why people would object to such a great project.”

Alternatively, proponents have proposed expanding the input of recycled Peninsula wastewater delivered by Monterey One Water and the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District to Cal Am.

It is touted as cheaper than the desalination plant, but critics question whether the water source would provide a sufficient supply.

To move forward, the California Public Utilities Commission would need to authorize the water expansion purchase and the deal would require Cal Am, M1W and MPWM to sign off.

Cal Am says it still plans to sign that deal and suggests that both projects — the desalination plant and the water expansion — could move forward together.

But according to MPWM, taking on both projects would bring unnecessary costs.

The CPUC is scheduled to review the proposal on December 1.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *